Rheumatoid arthritis is triggered by a faulty immune system and affects the wrist and small joints of the hand, including the knuckles and the middle joints of the fingers. People having rheumatoid arthritis know that exercise is good for them. But, finding the time, energy and motivation to actually get moving can be difficult.

Exercises for Joints

Research shows that exercise helps to relieve rheumatoid arthritis symptoms and improve day-to-day functioning. The workout can help you feel better by boosting up your mood, improving joint functioning and preventing muscle wasting and weakness. But, make sure to talk to your doctor before starting an exercise program or a joint pain diet. Below are listed some of the exercises for rheumatoid arthritis:

Exercises That Are Good For Your Joints

  • Sticking with Low Impact Workouts- Low impact exercises are of great help in treating rheumatoid arthritis. Exercises like stair climbing, walking, dancing and low impact cardio machines are better than the activities that put stress on your joints, like running or playing basketball. It also helps to strengthen your bones and keeps you away from joint pain medication.
  • Work out in Water– Aquatic exercises are especially gentle and painful vice versa because water helps to support your weight reducing joint stress and also when done in warm water, it reduces stiffness. Water also provides a natural resistance for an effectual and strengthening workout. It helps with flexibility, the range of motion, aerobic conditioning and strength.
  • Isometric Exercises– These are strength training workouts in which the muscle contract, but the body doesn’t move. It involves tensing a muscle, then relaxing it. It is beneficial if the usual weight lifting causes your joints to hurt.
  • Isometric Chest Press– To gain strength in your chest, keep your arms at the chest level and press the palms of your hands together as hard as you can. Hold it for five seconds and then rest for the same span of time. Repeat the same five times. Then, slowly build up to holding the press for ten to fifteen seconds at a time.
  • Isometric Shoulder Extension– This helps you develop greater shoulder strength. Initiate with standing with your back against a wall and your arms at your sides. Then, with your elbows straight, push your arms back towards the wall. Hold it for five seconds and then rest. Repeat the procedure ten times.
  • Isometric Thigh Exercise– Get your thighs in shape with least joint pain by sitting on the floor or a bed with one leg straight and the other bent. Then, tighten the thigh muscles of your straight leg as hard as you can and count to six. Relax, and then repeat the procedure. Do the same with the opposite leg, gradually increasing up to five, then ten and then fifteen repetitions, twice a day with each leg.
  • Improve Flexibility– Gentle stretching is very effective to relieve the pain and stiffness of rheumatoid arthritis. It also helps to increase your range of motion. Start each stretching session with a light three to five minute aerobic warm up, then, stretch fingers, wrists, elbow, feet and hip rotation, hold stretches for thirty seconds without bouncing or jerking. Keep it smooth, not intense and it will make you feel good.
  • Tai Chi– It is gentle movement exercise, practitioners work slowly and smoothly through a system of movements and postures that are meant to connect the body with the mind. It helps in strengthening, improving flexibility, balance, and coordination. It also reduces stress and anxiety. You will realize the better concentration after doing this exercise.

Rest is also essential along with exercises. While exercising, keep in mind that you pace yourself don’t overdo it and if it causes pain, stop immediately. Excess rest is also harmful as your muscles get weak and your joint pain can actually get worse. So, try to keep balance.

Work with your doctor to find the right exercise for you, and consult him about when you should skip it due to symptoms. Moreover, be clear about the joint health supplement and the joint health tablet. Also, get yourself a trainer to avoid doing the wrong exercise. Stay active to live healthy.

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Steve Marc

Steve Marc is a professional in the health, nutrition and diet industry.